SMITHSONIAN ACQUISITIONS, WOLFSONIAN EXHIBITIONS, (AND OF COURSE!) JULIUS KLINGER…

After months of blog silence (what can I say? The summer months in Montreal are busy at the gallery and I have not yet picked up the habit of writing daily…) PosterRomance is back and we have so much to report!

This year, unlike last (which would be, as Queen Elizabeth notably put it, an “annus horribilis” what with endless construction in front of the gallery that left us roadless, sans sidewalk, often powerless, and more than mildly depressed) has been fantastic.

 

I think the “Giant” dog looks kind of like the dog in our Wegman poster

 

Montreal is celebrating it’s 375th anniversary which has translated into street parties, roaming mechanical giants, fireworks festivals and record number of gallery guests. We’ve had people from literally all over the globe and it’s been fundamentally rewarding to helm an active arts destination in the city. Lilian, Desiree, Danijela, Allison, Dana and I have been so busy that the summer has literally flown by.

And the fall promises to be exciting too: after years of Klinger-centric work (you’ll remember that Beyond Poster Art in Vienna: The Life and Art of Julius Klinger was published last year. It is available for purchase here) the Wolfsonian Museum (part of Florida International University) will be opening their Klinger exhibition in October.

 

Lustige Blätter and Klinger’s 8th Issue War Bonds Poster (still available for purchase)

 

During the research of the book, and after I heard about the planned exhibition, I contacted the exhibition’s curator, the noted British academic and author Jeremy Aynsley, about whom I’ve written before and who has subsequently become a new friend and L’Affichiste supporter. With Jeremy’s help and support, I was able to take a two-week intensive Master Class in Modern Graphic Design at the New School in New York during the spring.

 

 

The class, offered at the Cooper-Hewitt, provided remarkable insight not only into the subject matter, but also offered a sneak-peek at some of the vast holdings of the Museum (which is affiliated with the Smithsonian). Although there were many highlights, on a personal and completely immodest level, the Smithsonian’s acquisition of my Klinger book for their permanent collection was perhaps my favourite moment.

The book also received notice from Steven Heller,  a man who is a legend in the world of modern graphic design. Mr. Heller has – both on his own and with his equally accomplished wife, Louise Fili – written many, many books on practically all elements of design while teaching, coaching, reviewing, and blogging on an almost constant basis. His review of Beyond Poster Art in Vienna not only made my mother proud, it also made me feel that the five years of effort that took the book from inception to publication were worthwhile.

 

Also available for purchase, Klinger’s Pessl Perfume Advertisement, and the exquisite Tabu Antinicotin

 

So, in October I will happily walk through the Klinger exhibition at the Wolf. Jeremy has been kind enough to keep me abreast of its progress and gave Giulian and I a ‘paper walk through’ of the show when we got together in London in July. Some of the Klinger posters held by L’Affichiste have been loaned for the exhibition and I am most certain that if Julius Klinger was alive today, he would be pleased, flattered, and honoured by the attention and detail that is being given to his work and his life.

PosterRomance is back and I do promise to write more fully and more often. If there’s a topic you’d like to see covered, let me know.

 
Happy Labour Day everyone ☺

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